Images of the Roof
and information on and images of other roofs and shingles







The roof from the bell stage of the Tower. The right side faces south; the left, north.
The southern exposure has deteriorated the greatest. June 2, 2016.



Detail of the southern exposure from the bell stage of the Tower.
Deterioration is greatest in the area closest to the eaves. June 2, 2016.



The ceiling on May 4, 2016, showing children's swimming pools set up to catch leaks. x.



The ceiling in the main hall showing water damage to the ceiling.
This has since been repaired (see below). July 7, 2015.



Setting up scaffolding to repair leak damage to the ceiling, May 4, 2016.



Repair to the ceiling being undertaken. May 9, 2016.



The ceiling on May 11, 2016.



The ceiling on May 11, 2016.


Alternative Roofing Materials Investigated


A cape in Hancock recently re-roofed with western red cedar roof shingles. February 27, 2016 .



LifePine southern yellow pine shingles being installed on a house at Sky Meadow, Nashua, June 2008.



LifePine southern yellow pine shingles on a house at Sky Meadow, Nashua, June 2008.



Alaskan yellow cedar shingles on the Marrett House barn, Standish, Maine.

"I have looked into the shingles that Historic New England used in Maine. The property is the Marrett House (1789) in Standish, Maine. Both the house and barn have wooden roof shingles, but the barn was re-roofed a few years ago with Alaskan yellow cedar shingles, which are of a species that was formerly unavailable in the Northeast but is now supplied by several dealers. The Marrett House barn shingles were of premium grade and measure 18" by 5/8." They are intended to be applied with a 7-1/2" exposure to the weather. Their trade name is Certi-Sawn No. 1 Blue Label 18-inch Tapersawn Shakes. I'm attaching a scan of both sides of the label. As you'll see, these are shown attached to strapping or shingle laths that are applied directly on the raVers without roof sheathing. Obviously, this applicaiton method will not pertain to an eighteenth-century building in New England, so it would be wise, as the label says, to "refer to the CSSB's [Cedar Shake and Shingle Bureau's] New Roof Construction Manual for the proper applica6on method of solid deck installation."
Source: E-mail from Jim Garvin, April 25, 2016.


Product information for the yellow cedar shingles used on the Marrett House barn, Standish, Maine.



A somewhat unusual asphalt shingle on a building on Main Street, Marlborough. August 2015.



Aritificial slate being installed on a house on Main Street in Jaffrey. April 9, 2016.



Metal roof shingles on a house on Rt. 124 in New Ipswich. October 11, 2015.



Metal shingles used on the Thulander Heritage Museum roof in Francestown, October 2015.






The New Roof Construction Manual issued by the Cedar Shake & Shingle Bureau, November 2004.



Roofing White Papers from Historic New England.



The specifications for the Meetinghouse roof replacement in 1995


These and other photographs related to the roof may be found at https://rs41.smugmug.com/Jaffrey/Meetinghouse/The-Roof/